Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Emily Dickinson's Garden Week 3







On Monday I strolled over to Emily's garden, this time with my "grand-dog" in tow, as I was dog sitting for a couple of days. We've been having a heat wave here in Massachusetts....no joke..it is supposed to be 80 today and I am already having to water my garden! So, in the past week the plants have been growing like ... well... like weeds. Emily's garden has still not had its Spring cleaning. I am not sure what is up with that. Amherst College (which owns the Dickinson properties) has a gazillion grounds workers and wonderful landscaping. They must be focused on getting their campus ready for graduation weekend or something. If I wasn't so busy getting my own garden ready for the Tour, I would go over with my rake and do some guerrilla gardening. Have you heard of the global guerrilla gardeners' activities?


Well, I digress. In Emily's garden the magnolia was blooming, the tulips we brilliant and a large (cherry??) tree was in full bloom. In several places the foliage of Bleeding Hearts had gone from barely peeking out of the ground to about 8" tall in one week. This week is another hot one here so stay tuned for pictures of next week's Spring happenings at Emily's.

4 comments:

Alexia said...

I HAVE heard of guerrila gardening, on NPR. I love the seed bomb ideas.

Shady Gardener said...

I'd never heard of guerrila gardening... what a Great Idea! ;-) It conjurs all sorts of sneaky ideas!
Otherwise, what are those tulips? They are so unusual! Our weather has been gorgeous lately, too. Most welcome. :-)

Cabs said...

I have no idea what the tulips are in Emily's garden but I agree..they are quite stunning. If ever I find out who the gardner is there..... I shall ask!

Rosie Perera said...

There's a great story of guerrila gardening in Vancouver, BC, which was documented in a short film called "The Well Watered Garden."

Here's a trailer

Here's a podcast about it, by City Farmer TV.

More about the garden and info on ordering the documentary can be found on this page at the website of Jacob's Well, the community that created the garden.